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Description

Time tools for flor and the floraison group.

It uses et-orbi to represent time instances and raabro as a basis for its parsers.

Fugit is a core dependency of rufus-scheduler 3.5.x.

Monthly Downloads: 676,977
Programming language: Ruby
License: MIT License

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README

fugit

Build Status Gem Version Join the chat at https://gitter.im/floraison/fugit

Time tools for flor and the floraison group.

It uses et-orbi to represent time instances and raabro as a basis for its parsers.

Fugit is a core dependency of rufus-scheduler 3.5.x.

Sister projects

The intersection of those two projects is where fugit is born:

  • rufus-scheduler - a cron/at/in/every/interval in-process scheduler, in fact, it's the father project to this fugit project
  • flor - a Ruby workflow engine, fugit provides the foundation for its time scheduling capabilities

Similar, sometimes overlapping projects

  • chronic - a pure Ruby natural language date parser
  • parse-cron - parses cron expressions and calculates the next occurrence after a given date
  • ice_cube - Ruby date recurrence library
  • ISO8601 - Ruby parser to work with ISO8601 dateTimes and durations
  • ...

Projects using fugit

Fugit.parse(s)

The simplest way to use fugit is via Fugit.parse(s).

require 'fugit'

Fugit.parse('0 0 1 jan *').class         # ==> ::Fugit::Cron
Fugit.parse('12y12M').class              # ==> ::Fugit::Duration

Fugit.parse('2017-12-12').class          # ==> ::EtOrbi::EoTime
Fugit.parse('2017-12-12 UTC').class      # ==> ::EtOrbi::EoTime

Fugit.parse('every day at noon').class   # ==> ::Fugit::Cron

If fugit cannot extract a cron, duration or point in time out of the string, it will return nil.

Fugit.parse('nada')
  # ==> nil

Fugit.do_parse(s)

Fugit.do_parse(s) is equivalent to Fugit.parse(s), but instead of returning nil, it raises an error if the given string contains no time information.

Fugit.do_parse('nada')
  # ==> /home/jmettraux/w/fugit/lib/fugit/parse.rb:32
  #     :in `do_parse': found no time information in "nada" (ArgumentError)

parse_cron, parse_in, parse_at, parse_duration, and parse_nat

require 'fugit'

Fugit.parse_cron('0 0 1 jan *').class       # ==> ::Fugit::Cron
Fugit.parse_duration('12y12M').class        # ==> ::Fugit::Duration

Fugit.parse_at('2017-12-12').class          # ==> ::EtOrbi::EoTime
Fugit.parse_at('2017-12-12 UTC').class      # ==> ::EtOrbi::EoTime

Fugit.parse_nat('every day at noon').class  # ==> ::Fugit::Cron

do_parse_cron, do_parse_in, do_parse_at, do_parse_duration, and do_parse_nat

As Fugit.parse(s) returns nil when it doesn't grok its input, and Fugit.do_parse(s) fails when it doesn't grok, each of the parse_ methods has its partner do_parse_ method.

Fugit::Cron

A class Fugit::Cron to parse cron strings and then #next_time and #previous_time to compute the next or the previous occurrence respectively.

There is also a #brute_frequency method which returns an array [ shortest delta, longest delta, occurrence count ] where delta is the time between two occurrences.

require 'fugit'

c = Fugit::Cron.parse('0 0 * *  sun')
  # or
c = Fugit::Cron.new('0 0 * *  sun')

p Time.now  # => 2017-01-03 09:53:27 +0900

p c.next_time      # => 2017-01-08 00:00:00 +0900
p c.previous_time  # => 2017-01-01 00:00:00 +0900

p c.brute_frequency  # => [ 604800, 604800, 53 ]
                     #    [ delta min, delta max, occurrence count ]
p c.rough_frequency  # => 7 * 24 * 3600 (7d rough frequency)

p c.match?(Time.parse('2017-08-06'))  # => true
p c.match?(Time.parse('2017-08-07'))  # => false
p c.match?('2017-08-06')              # => true
p c.match?('2017-08-06 12:00')        # => false

Example of cron strings understood by fugit:

'5 0 * * *'         # 5 minutes after midnight, every day
'15 14 1 * *'       # at 1415 on the 1st of every month
'0 22 * * 1-5'      # at 2200 on weekdays
'0 22 * * mon-fri'  # idem
'23 0-23/2 * * *'   # 23 minutes after 00:00, 02:00, 04:00, ...

'@yearly'    # turns into '0 0 1 1 *'
'@monthly'   # turns into '0 0 1 * *'
'@weekly'    # turns into '0 0 * * 0'
'@daily'     # turns into '0 0 * * *'
'@midnight'  # turns into '0 0 * * *'
'@hourly'    # turns into '0 * * * *'

'0 0 L * *'     # last day of month at 00:00
'0 0 last * *'  # idem
'0 0 -7-L * *'  # from the seventh to last to the last day of month at 00:00

# and more...

the modulo extension

Fugit, since 1.1.10, also understands cron strings like "9 0 * * sun%2" which can be read as "every other Sunday at 9am".

For odd Sundays, one can write 9 0 * * sun%2+1.

It can be combined, as in 9 0 * * sun%2,tue%3+2

But what does it references to? It starts at 1 on 2019-01-01.

require 'et-orbi' # >= 1.1.8

# the reference
p EtOrbi.parse('2019-01-01').wday       # => 2
p EtOrbi.parse('2019-01-01').rweek      # => 1
p EtOrbi.parse('2019-01-01').rweek % 2  # => 1

# today (as of this coding...)
p EtOrbi.parse('2019-04-11').wday       # => 4
p EtOrbi.parse('2019-04-11').rweek      # => 15
p EtOrbi.parse('2019-04-11').rweek % 2  # => 1

Fugit::Duration

A class Fugit::Duration to parse duration strings (vanilla rufus-scheduler ones and ISO 8601 ones).

Provides duration arithmetic tools.

require 'fugit'

d = Fugit::Duration.parse('1y2M1d4h')

p d.to_plain_s  # => "1Y2M1D4h"
p d.to_iso_s    # => "P1Y2M1DT4H" ISO 8601 duration
p d.to_long_s   # => "1 year, 2 months, 1 day, and 4 hours"

d += Fugit::Duration.parse('1y1h')

p d.to_long_s  # => "2 years, 2 months, 1 day, and 5 hours"

d += 3600

p d.to_plain_s  # => "2Y2M1D5h3600s"

The to_*_s methods are also available as class methods:

p Fugit::Duration.to_plain_s('1y2M1d4h')
  # => "1Y2M1D4h"
p Fugit::Duration.to_iso_s('1y2M1d4h')
  # => "P1Y2M1DT4H" ISO 8601 duration
p Fugit::Duration.to_long_s('1y2M1d4h')
  # => "1 year, 2 months, 1 day, and 4 hours"

Fugit::At

Points in time are parsed and given back as EtOrbi::EoTime instances.

Fugit::At.parse('2017-12-12').to_s
  # ==> "2017-12-12 00:00:00 +0900" (at least here in Hiroshima)

Fugit::At.parse('2017-12-12 12:00:00 America/New_York').to_s
  # ==> "2017-12-12 12:00:00 -0500"

Directly with Fugit.parse_at(s) is OK too:

Fugit.parse_at('2017-12-12 12:00:00 America/New_York').to_s
  # ==> "2017-12-12 12:00:00 -0500"

Directly with Fugit.parse(s) is OK too:

Fugit.parse('2017-12-12 12:00:00 America/New_York').to_s
  # ==> "2017-12-12 12:00:00 -0500"

Fugit::Nat

Fugit understand some kind of "natural" language:

For example, those "every" get turned into Fugit::Cron instances:

Fugit::Nat.parse('every day at five')                         # ==> '0 5 * * *'
Fugit::Nat.parse('every weekday at five')                     # ==> '0 5 * * 1,2,3,4,5'
Fugit::Nat.parse('every day at 5 pm')                         # ==> '0 17 * * *'
Fugit::Nat.parse('every tuesday at 5 pm')                     # ==> '0 17 * * 2'
Fugit::Nat.parse('every wed at 5 pm')                         # ==> '0 17 * * 3'
Fugit::Nat.parse('every day at 16:30')                        # ==> '30 16 * * *'
Fugit::Nat.parse('every day at 16:00 and 18:00')              # ==> '0 16,18 * * *'
Fugit::Nat.parse('every day at noon')                         # ==> '0 12 * * *'
Fugit::Nat.parse('every day at midnight')                     # ==> '0 0 * * *'
Fugit::Nat.parse('every tuesday and monday at 5pm')           # ==> '0 17 * * 1,2'
Fugit::Nat.parse('every wed or Monday at 5pm and 11')         # ==> '0 11,17 * * 1,3'
Fugit::Nat.parse('every day at 5 pm on America/Los_Angeles')  # ==> '0 17 * * * America/Los_Angeles'
Fugit::Nat.parse('every day at 6 pm in Asia/Tokyo')           # ==> '0 18 * * * Asia/Tokyo'
Fugit::Nat.parse('every 3 hours')                             # ==> '0 */3 * * *'
Fugit::Nat.parse('every 4 months')                            # ==> '0 0 1 */4 *'
Fugit::Nat.parse('every 5 minutes')                           # ==> '*/5 * * * *'
Fugit::Nat.parse('every 15s')                                 # ==> '*/15 * * * * *'

Directly with Fugit.parse(s) is OK too:

Fugit.parse('every day at five')  # ==> Fugit::Cron instance '0 5 * * *'

Ambiguous nats

Not all strings result in a clean, single, cron expression.

Fugit::Nat.parse('every day at 16:00 and 18:00', multi: true)
  # ==> [ '0 16,18 * * *' ]
Fugit::Nat.parse('every day at 16:15 and 18:30')
  # ==> [ '15 16 * * *' ]
Fugit::Nat.parse('every day at 16:15 and 18:30', multi: true)
  # ==> [ '15 16 * * *', '30 18 * * *' ]
Fugit::Nat.parse('every day at 16:15 and 18:30', multi: :fail)
  # ==> ArgumentError: multiple crons in "every day at 16:15 and 18:30" (15 16 * * * | 30 18 * * *)

LICENSE

MIT, see [LICENSE.txt](LICENSE.txt)


*Note that all licence references and agreements mentioned in the fugit README section above are relevant to that project's source code only.