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Description

This gem allows you to track memory usage and time passage in your code. The output is puts'd to the console, and it also writes to a long-running CSV and per-object log file in logs/schwad_performance_logger.

It also gives handy access to get_process_mem, benchmark/ips and memory_profiler

Monthly Downloads: 288
Programming language: Ruby
License: MIT License

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README

SchwadPerformanceLogger

This gem allows you to track memory usage and time passage in your code. It does this during the life of the SPL object, as well as giving deltas between each check. The output is puts'd to the console, and it also writes to a long-running CSV and per-object log file in logs/schwad_performance_logger

Installation

Add this line to your application's Gemfile:

gem 'schwad_performance_logger'

And then execute:

$ bundle

Or install it yourself as:

$ gem install schwad_performance_logger

Usage

pl = SPL.new({full_memo: 'Check extract method refactoring'})

**********************************************************************
Starting initialization. Current memory: 12(Mb), difference of 0 (mb) since beginning and difference of 0 since last log. time passed: 0.004678 seconds, time since last run: 0.004678
**********************************************************************

Each subsequent log:

pl.log_performance("Test memo")

*********************************************************************
Starting Test memo. Current memory: 12(Mb), difference of 0 (mb) since beginning and difference of 0 since last log. time passed: 22.493993 seconds, time since last run: 9.616874
*********************************************************************

Options

full_memo option adds an extra header in the log outputs as well as a header to each new set of csv outputs. This is not to be confused with the 'per-run' message passed to #log_performance which is only passed to that check.

To disable any of the outputs:

SPL.new({puts: false, log: false, csv: false})

To have the logger 'pause' a number of seconds during the puts logging so that you can actually see the log as it goes by. This does not affect the 'time' measurement:

SPL.new({pause: 8})

Usage example:

pl = SPL.new({pause: 3, full_memo: 'Retry object-oriented approach.', log: false})
pl.log_performance('check status before writing to database')

# code here

pl.log_performance('check status after writing to database')

# code

pl.log_performance('inspect final performance after executing service')

Further Profiling Tools

As well as logging memory and time throughout your code, SPL gives you easy access to frequently used popular profiling tools to inspect your code blocks.

IPS

Handy access to Benchmark-ips measurements, just pass a block to ips:

SPL.ips do
   ary = []
   35.times do
     ary << (1..99).to_a.sample
   end
end

#=> #<Benchmark::IPS::Report:0x00007fbc7f91df50 @entries=[#<Benchmark::IPS::Report::Entry:0x00007fbc7e0c3bd0 @label="PerformanceLogMethod", @microseconds=5002798.0, @iterations=34020, @stats=#<Benchmark::IPS::Stats::SD:0x00007fbc7e0c3c48 @mean=6805.780564500376, @error=195>, @measurement_cycle=630, @show_total_time=true>], @data=nil>

Time

Same flow as above. Tired of writing out start_time and Time.now - start_time and also needing to 'puts' it out? Pass a block to #time. Runs ten times and spits out an average as well.

SPL.time do
   ary = []
   35.times do
     ary << (1..99).to_a.sample
   end
end

#=> Average runtime 0.0002649 seconds. Max time 0.000508.seconds

Allocate Count

Before, you would have to enable the GC before your code, use ObjectSpace to count objects before your code, then use it again after your code to compare allocated objects during your block of code. You'd also have to re-enable the GC! Gosh, that sure is a lot of work if you want to do this frequently. We make it simple.

SPL.allocate_count do
   ary = []
   35.times do
     ary << (1..99).to_a.sample
   end
end

#=> {:FREE=>-121, :T_STRING=>50, :T_ARRAY=>36, :T_IMEMO=>35}

Profile Memory

Gives you quick access to the amazing memory_profiler gem.

SPL.profile_memory do
   ary = []
   35.times do
     ary << (1..99).to_a.sample
   end
end

# Total allocated: 37576 bytes (36 objects)
# Total retained:  0 bytes (0 objects)
#
# allocated memory by gem
# -----------------------------------
#      37576  other
#
# allocated memory by file
# -----------------------------------
#      37576  (irb)
#
# allocated memory by location
# -----------------------------------
#      37240  (irb):37
#        336  (irb):35
#
# allocated memory by class
# -----------------------------------
#      37576  Array
#
# allocated objects by gem
# -----------------------------------
#         36  other
#
# allocated objects by file
# -----------------------------------
#         36  (irb)
#
# allocated objects by location
# -----------------------------------
#         35  (irb):37
#          1  (irb):35
#
# allocated objects by class
# -----------------------------------
#         36  Array

All Objects

Similarly, it's nice to get a rundown of all objects, in hash format, instead of goofing around with ObjectSpace manually we offer that up for you as well.

SPL.all_objects do
  ary = []
  35.times do
    ary << (1..99).to_a.sample
  end
end

#=> [[Benchmark::IPS::Job, 1], [Rational, 1], [Benchmark::IPS::Report::Entry, 1], [Benchmark::IPS::Stats::SD, 1], [FFI::DynamicLibrary, 1], [DidYouMean::ClassNameChecker, 1], [Thread::Backtrace, 1], [NameError::message, 1], [NameError, 1], [#<Class:0x00007fbc7e816478>, 1], [Gem::Platform, 1], [IRB::Notifier::CompositeNotifier, 1], [IRB::Notifier::NoMsgNotifier, 1], [Enumerator, 1], [RubyToken::TkSPACE, 1], [FFI::Type::Mapped, 1], [IRB::ReadlineInputMethod, 1], [IRB::WorkSpace, 1], [IRB::Context, 1], [IRB::Irb, 1], [Gem::PathSupport, 1], [Monitor, 1], [IRB::Locale, 1], [DidYouMean::PlainFormatter, 1], [DidYouMean::DeprecatedIgnoredCallers, 1], [IRB::SLex, 1], [RubyLex, 1], [DidYouMean::ClassNameChecker::ClassName, 1], [URI::RFC2396_Parser, 1], [URI::RFC3986_Parser, 1], [Complex, 1], [ThreadGroup, 1], [IOError, 1], [Thread, 1], [RubyVM, 1], [NoMemoryError, 1], [SystemStackError, 1], [Random, 1], [ARGF.class, 1], [Benchmark::IPS::Job::Entry, 1], [Benchmark::IPS::Report, 1], [Benchmark::IPS::Job::StdoutReport, 1], [#<Class:0x00007fbc7e023e50>, 1], [FFI::Pointer, 1], [FFI::FunctionType, 2], [Integer, 2], [IRB::StdioOutputMethod, 2], [Binding, 2], [RubyToken::TkDOT, 2], [RubyToken::TkIDENTIFIER, 2], [FFI::StructLayout, 2], [UnboundMethod, 2], [RubyToken::TkEND, 2], [FFI::DynamicLibrary::Symbol, 2], [FFI::Function, 2], [fatal, 2], [RubyToken::TkNL, 3], [Thread::Mutex, 3], [IRB::Notifier::LeveledNotifier, 3], [IO, 5], [IRB::Inspector, 5], [BigDecimal, 6], [Float, 6], [FFI::StructLayout::Number, 7], [Object, 9], [Range, 17], [FFI::Type::Builtin, 21], [MatchData, 27], [Gem::Specification, 30], [Time, 31], [Module, 71], [IRB::SLex::Node, 78], [Gem::Dependency, 89], [Proc, 91], [Encoding, 101], [Symbol, 127], [Gem::Requirement, 159], [Hash, 188], [Gem::Version, 209], [Gem::StubSpecification, 252], [Gem::StubSpecification::StubLine, 252], [Regexp, 279], [Class, 633], [Array, 1838], [String, 15818]]

Objects by Size

You can break down your objects by size as well, useful for debugging.

SPL.objects_by_size do
  ary = []
  35.times do
    ary << (1..99).to_a.sample
  end
end

#=> {:T_OBJECT=>101848, :T_CLASS=>730344, :T_MODULE=>76808, :T_FLOAT=>240, :T_STRING=>882168, :T_REGEXP=>200350, :T_ARRAY=>714384, :T_HASH=>150408, :T_STRUCT=>800, :T_BIGNUM=>80, :T_FILE=>1160, :T_DATA=>1074338, :T_MATCH=>28280, :T_COMPLEX=>40, :T_RATIONAL=>40, :T_SYMBOL=>5080, :T_IMEMO=>325040, :T_ICLASS=>3280, :TOTAL=>4294688}

Development

After checking out the repo, run bin/setup to install dependencies. Then, run rake spec to run the tests. You can also run bin/console for an interactive prompt that will allow you to experiment.

To install this gem onto your local machine, run bundle exec rake install. To release a new version, update the version number in version.rb, and then run bundle exec rake release, which will create a git tag for the version, push git commits and tags, and push the .gem file to rubygems.org.

Contributing

Bug reports and pull requests are welcome on GitHub at https://github.com/[USERNAME]/schwad_performance_logger. This project is intended to be a safe, welcoming space for collaboration, and contributors are expected to adhere to the Contributor Covenant code of conduct.

License

The gem is available as open source under the terms of the MIT License.

Code of Conduct

Everyone interacting in the SPL project’s codebases, issue trackers, chat rooms and mailing lists is expected to follow the code of conduct.


*Note that all licence references and agreements mentioned in the SchwadPerformanceLogger README section above are relevant to that project's source code only.